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Introducing the

Learning
Center

SLA's new
online center for broker
education and broker license
renewal assistance.

SLA's new online center
for broker education and
broker license renewal assistance.

SLA's new online center for broker
education and broker license
renewal assistance.

Learn More

Introducing the

Emerging Risks
Discussion Forum

A new way to
have dialogue about
emerging risks in the
surplus line industry.

A new way to have dialogue
about emerging risks in the
surplus line industry.

A new way to have dialogue
about emerging risks in the
surplus line industry.

Learn More

General

A:
The SLA accepts e-signatures that are a replica of the original signature or a digital signature from the California Secretary of State’s Approved List of Digital Signature Certification Authorities.  Refer to link https://www.sos.ca.gov/administration/regulations/current-regulations/technology/digital-signatures/approved-certification-authorities/
A:
The amount of gross premium a surplus line broker must report if premiums are billed and payable in installments shall be the amount of the installment premium itself, provided the amount and due date of each installment, or the basis for determining each installment, are identifiable in the policy or an endorsement. Refer to CIC section 1774(d).
A:
A surplus line insurer may be sued upon any cause of action arising in this state under any surplus line insurance contract made by it, or any evidence of insurance issued or delivered by the surplus line broker, pursuant to the procedures set forth in CIC sections 1610 to 1620.  Any policy or evidence of insurance issued by the surplus line insurer or the surplus line broker shall contain a provision which both states the substance of this section of the California Insurance Code, and designates the person to whom the Commissioner shall mail process.  Refer to CIC section 1772.
A:

The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS, pronounced Nakes) was developed as the standard for use by Federal statistical agencies in classifying business establishments for the collection, analysis, and publication of statistical data related to the business economy of the U.S.

NAICS was developed under the auspices of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and adopted in 1997 to replace the old Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system.

It was also developed in cooperation with the statistical agencies of Canada and Mexico to establish a 3-country standard that allows for a high level of comparability in business statistics among the three countries.

NAICS is the first economic classification system to be constructed based on a single economic concept. Click here to learn more about the background, the development and the difference between NAICS and the SIC.

A:
Coverage may be considered surplus line if insurance cannot be procured from admitted insurers who are a) admitted for the particular class or classes of business of insurance being written and b) who actually write the particular type of insurance in the insured’s home state.
A:
The Export List is a list of specific coverage types that can be exported to the surplus line market without the agent, broker, or surplus line broker having to conduct a diligent search of the admitted market.  If the type of risk appears on the Export List, a Diligent Search Report (SL-2) form is not required.

The current Export List can be found here.
 
A:
The premium charged to insure a particular risk should not be less than the lowest rate which would be accepted by any admitted insurer to insure that risk. Refer to CIC section 1763.